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How to Deal With a Friend's or Family Member's Divorce

Page: 10 of 10
  • You have big relationship news but aren't sure if you should share it with a friend who's going through a divorce.

    As long as you're not rubbing your good news in her face—for example, calling her every day with updates on your wedding plans—a good friend will want to know what's going on with you. Even if she can't be a cheerleader for love and romance, she will at least be happy for you. Plus, she may feel isolated or left out if she discovers you've hidden something from her. With news like an engagement, approach the friend sensitively, and don't feel slighted if her reaction is muted.

    Be upfront, suggests Swann: "Say, 'I know this may be hard for you, and I'd be so happy if you'd come to my bridal shower, but I understand if it isn't something you feel up to right now.'" That gives her the option of congratulating you one-on-one without having to share in the public celebration.

Split Happens
How to Deal With a Friend's or Family Member's Divorce
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